My work offers models of relational aesthetics that are undesirable at first glance in terms of the ideal tie between desire and the social sphere. It speaks of nature, which references existentialist moments within the repetitive scenario between power and struggle, consumed and consumer, subject and object, action and reaction in popular culture.
Perhaps, objects lifeless or alive, merely are but this evidence is enough not to break the tentative ties of identification, re-embodiment and reclaim the figure of the post-human future instead of fixed identities.
What characterises the work is the sensitive assumption that - behind the smooth surface - an abyss of hidden desire and forbidden passion can be captured, a major conflict between the search for identity and the pleasure principles, between social constraint and personal ambition: the past and the future.
Under a contextual framework, it is in these areas where humanity seems to suggest a greater even existential connection to the natural world. We are instantly confronted with all that is human. The complex narrative becomes simplified and transformed through a string of interpretations and re-interpretations that at the same time exercises a degree of hope and collective desire as I confront the viewer with his own feelings of attraction and repulsion, of power, control and impotence.

How to depict the emotional body is the red thread in my work. I am fascinated with the psychological aspect of the body and its emotional link to ‘Abject’, the borderline of inside/outside, something that is aesthetically desirable, yet revolting and were viewer’s attraction are replaced by repulsion, power, control and impotence.
In my work, I have always been particularly drawn to the body, how to depict the emotional body and working with skin as the physical element that divides the Self from the other, as well as the potential container for both and what happens if you open up those boundaries.

I am fascinated with the psychological aspect of consumerism and its emotional link to ‘Abject’.
All of this forms part of Burdens of Excess where I play with visions of the future, scenes of surgical fetishes and glamour and unsettle the viewer with images of carefully staged and naturalistic wax reproduction of human organs in form of luxury fetish.
In Burdens of Excess I use the aesthetic codes of a chic, seductive luxury boutique with its black walls, glittery flooring and the way the organ objects are presented on plinths, hermetically sealed behind glass boxes. The subject matters of both the desire for luxury items as well as the darker side of plastic surgery’s intestine-liposuction filled accessories are both synonym with what Hollywood glamour represents for me in order to be accepted, to be part of the ‘tribe’. I feel it is very fitting to show this particular body of work in Hollywood as its subject resonates with so much it stands for.

I dissect moral concepts generated by the media and deeply entrenched concepts in our society without reassembling the dissected, separated and ornamented pieces into a new or different whole - thus confronts the viewer with his or her own feelings of attraction and repulsion.
My work explors models of relational aesthetics with objects that are undesirable at first glance. Her work references existentialist moments within the repetitive scenario between power and struggle. What characterises these work is the sensitive assumption that - behind the smooth surface - an abyss of hidden desire and forbidden passion can be captured, a major conflict between the search for identity and the pleasure principles, between social constraint and personal ambition: the past and the future. The complex narrative becomes simplified and transformed through a string of interpretations and re-interpretations that at the same time exercises a degree of hope and collective desire as she confronts the viewer with their own feelings of attraction and repulsion, of power, control and impotence.
For Embrace the Base - a Commission for Greenham Common- I have created a new sculptural body of work that takes the site’s history as a starting point, particularly the Women’s Peace Camp situated there for almost 20 years to protest nuclear weapons being stored on site.
For this Commission,I have taken a political element as the starting point and relate it back to body politics. Metaphorically I am taking the notion of the tents, which were on site during the Women’s Peace Camp, as the container for emotions and ‘humanise’ these elements to create emotional surfaces: the nylon tents fabric are used as a metaphor for skin: as the containers to project emotions. The women’s protest was driven by the fearful impact the nuclear threat has on them and on their children. The large igloo tent ‘The Matriarch’ represents the place where this fear manifests itself: in the core of the body and ‘ Next of Kin’ symbolizes its child counterpart. The three intestine figures explore the notion of a nuclear aftermath.